After a very cool and wet spring, we haven’t had any rain for almost 10 days now.  Local gardeners are starting to worry and complain, while grass-farmers like myself are rejoicing.  It’s been about as perfect a hay-growing year here in Floyd as we can imagine.  The early rains brought all the green stuff along just great, and then quit entirely just in time to bring in the crop.  Many, many years we can get exactly the opposite, resulting in a poor or spoiled crop.

Mowed, raked and baled ’till after dark all week, and finally got the last of it up on the 150 acres or so tonite just as we heard thunder in the distance.  Couldn’t ask for anything more.  Great crop this year.  Floyd cows will eat well this winter.

Hay Bales

Hay Bales

The 20 acres or so of bottomland that were just 12′ high in multiflora rose and other undesirable species when I bought the farm 3 years ago are coming along very nicely in the grass, forbs and the clovers I planted, but given their previous state, I decided to once again just mow and lay it down to feed the soil, rather than baling it.  It takes several years to “establish” a grassland, where all the biota are working in harmony to build true fertility and sustainability.  We’ll start harvesting when we actually get to that point.  But I’m not in a hurry – it’s immensely satisfying just to watch the fields get richer and richer without taking anything from them.  If I were any happier, I would have to be two people!

Advertisements