Well, the second cabin is just about complete.  The chimney is up, it’s all chinked, the stairs are even built inside.  It won’t have any plumbing or electricity – it will be just like it would have been 150 years ago.  A historical artifact, and nothing more.

Log Cabin

Log Cabin

Highland Timberframe, who rebuilt this cabin, are very talented fellers who pay very close attention to detail.  The pegs to keep together the porch posts were all hand-carved:

Pegs

Pegs

The stairs presented a problem.  Originally they were in the middle of the house, but had been moved to an end-wall by the time of taking the cabin down. We decided to put the stairs where they originally were, but it was so steep, we couldn’t quite figure out how they did it.  The original builders may have not done it this way, but Jim and I had both seen this old-timey stair configuration for steep stairs, and thought they just might have.  It’s really a very clever and non-intuitive approach to solving the problem of steep stairs, allowing much better “clearance” for each foot-fall.  You can see it’s as steep as the modern step-ladder behind it, but in a lot of ways has much better ergonomics.

Cabin Stairs

Cabin Stairs

Trish and I still aren’t quite sure what we’ll exactly do with the cabin.  Probably put some rockers on the porch and come up and sit sometimes – it’s a beautiful site.  Maybe plant some fruit trees.  There are some yucca plants here that surely date back to the original homeplace, but the Moore’s would have also likely planted iris, daylilly, grape hyacinth, forsythia, and quince – all plants very easily transplanted and propogated from neighbors.  Those plants are almost always indicative of an old mountain house site.  So we’ll probably plant some of those, as we have some old-timey varieties transplanted from old mountain house sites many decades ago now.

How many stories does this old homesite tell? Sometime almost exactly 150 years ago, Noah Moore’s wife was reportedly standing right next to her cabin where this one now sits, holding her infant baby in her arms when she was struck by lightning and was killed.  The baby survived.  But this cabin sat for a hundred years – no telling the other stories….